Should Adventists Celebrate Easter?

For many Christians Easter is the time of the year in which they celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. It is a time for reflection, family, and festivities. Jesus Christ was crucified on a Friday, spent the Sabbath (sunset Friday to sunset Saturday) and the dark periods of Sunday in the tomb, and resurrected on Sunday morning. Christians believe that this sacrifice was done as payment for sin. The death that Christ died provides the opportunity for those who are willing to enter into relationship with Him to be barred from paying the ultimate sacrifice for their sins, death.

The corporate world sees the Easter period as a time for great revenue. The corporate world’s use of Easter in the secular realm has cause many to mistakenly argue that this is one of the reasons why Easter shouldn’t be celebrated. This argument has no substance because what corporate America decides to do concerning a moment of celebration for the Christian church is not the Christian church’s fault. They are simply capitalizing on a festive time. The same goes for Christmas.

Adventists find themselves in a debate over whether or not Easter should be celebrated. As is typical with most internal debates, the lines are divided between conservatives being against and liberals being for. The conservatives are against the celebration of Easter because they view the holiday as being of pagan origin. Their position is that of caution. What they would prefer to see is an exhaustive commentary providing evidence of Easter’s pagan roots.

The liberals have pretty much embraced the festive mood and may or may not be aware of Easter’s pagan roots. They are simply not interested in spending the time looking for what is wrong, but making the best of what is right. Their position is that we should look for the good in the moment. Both sides agree that Jesus should be emphasize, however, they have different ways of going about it.

I think fingers should not be pointed on those who celebrate it, with Easter bunny and all. Why? If one has ever read the council that Ellen White (whom people are willing to use only when it is beneficial to their argument) gives concerning the celebration of Christmas, then one can see why it is not a big deal to celebrate Easter. When White was asked, “shall we have a Christmas tree? Will it not be like the world?” She answered, “You can make it like the world if you have a disposition to do so, or you can make it as unlike the world as possible. There is no particular sin in selecting a fragrant evergreen and placing it in our churches, but the sin lies in the motive which prompts to action and the use which is made of the gifts placed upon the tree” (Adventist Home, p. 482.1).

Does this not contain a principle to use when it comes to holidays? I think it does. The idea of being different is often presented incorrectly and has led some to take positions that they would never have taken if they understood that one is not called simply to do things that are different just because the world (or other Christian denominations) do it a certain way. Should we not wear jeans just to be different from the world? Most would say of course not. Therefore, if our objective in doing something else is simply to be different then we are misled.

Is their a spiritual danger in celebrating Christmas? Yes, if your attention is not on Christ. This is a general observation. If your attention is not on Christ in any aspect of life, then you are spiritually in trouble. But Christmas in and of itself is not wrong unless one believes that the prophet is mistaken. If we rely on the same principle, then celebrating Easter won’t cause problems in terms of spirituality unless Jesus is not really the focus.

Ultimately the answer to the question really has to do with whether or not the individual is comfortable with the celebration of Easter. One should not be forced to do and neither should another be denied (or spoken of as if they are heretics). However, both need to immerse themselves in the talk of Jesus that is being done during this holiday. Make the best of the moment and find ways to talk about Christ.

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Author: Jerry Jacques

Jerry Jacques, is a native of Queens, New York. He was born in Cap-Haitien, Haiti on June 12, 1980. His purpose in setting up this blog is to think through biblically with others on theology, culture, and anything else that may catch his attention. His hope is that this blog will be a wonderful stopping point for all who visit. He enjoys reading, writing, movies, bowling, board games, and weight lifting. The views expressed here are the author’s own and not necessarily those of his church. If you are interested in getting in touch, write him at jacquesjerry@yahoo.com. Special Interests: Apocalyptic Prophecy, New Testament, Book of Revelation, Book of Daniel, Book of Habakkuk, Biblical Interpretation, Comparative Religion, and Christianity in Contemporary Culture.

2 thoughts on “Should Adventists Celebrate Easter?”

  1. Thank you again for pointing out a principle that so many of us miss. I believe that we have an opportunity to use these holidays for a good cause. When we look past the Easter bunny and see Christ’s sacrifice for our sins then it should make us sober. There is more than Christ’s death in the story. Christ rises from the grave and makes the point that He is stronger than death!

    This reminds me of some old hymns that we love to sing that started as popular bar room songs that had a makeover of sorts with changed lyrics, but many do not know the origin of some of these hymns.

    My position is not one where I believe that something is wrong with those who do not celebrate it. Whatever we do let’s keep Christ at the forefront.

  2. I don’t see anything wrong with celebrating Easter. It reminds me of what Jesus did for me and everyone else in the world. I always look forward to watching the crucifixion movies about Jesus and the disciples.

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